'Resilience to Violent Extremism: A Model for the Positive Development of Youth in Contexts of Social Marginalization.'
Jan
31
10:00 AM10:00

'Resilience to Violent Extremism: A Model for the Positive Development of Youth in Contexts of Social Marginalization.'

Professor Michael Ungar

Building on Dr. Ungar’s research in more than a dozen countries, this presentation explores how an emerging systemic understanding of resilience can account for how young people cope with experiences of exclusion without engaging in acts of violence. Resilience will be shown to be the result of how well individuals, their families and communities work together to help those who are vulnerable navigate their way to the resources they need for wellbeing, and whether those resources are available in ways that young people experience as meaningful.

Specifically, Dr. Ungar will discuss seven factors that contribute to the resilience of refugee and immigrant youth as well as young people who have experienced historical oppression. His work suggests the need for an ecological, culturally sensitive interpretation of what resilience means to youth and young adults who must cope with social and political unrest, marginalization and racism. Dr. Ungar will discuss each of the seven factors associated with resilience along with strategies individuals and social institutions have used to make resilience-promoting resources more available and accessible, including an innovative measure (the YRVE) developed in collaboration with Dr. Michele Grossman that assesses youth resilience to violent extremism.

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'Selective exposure to terrorist violence, emotions and democratic process: results from a panel study.'
Feb
7
4:30 PM16:30

'Selective exposure to terrorist violence, emotions and democratic process: results from a panel study.'


The positive role of negative emotions in facilitating democratic engagement has come to the fore in recent political science research. But negative emotions are not always a democratic plus. We provide needed balance to the study of political emotions by considering their potential democratic benefits and detriments, focusing on the emotional origins of selective exposure to news coverage of terrorist violence.

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